WHAT SPECIFIC TRAINING DO YOUR CAREGIVERS HAVE FOR THIS WORK?

Adult Family Home staff and providers have to undergo the following training:
Fundamentals of Caregiving
Home Care Aide Certification / CNA
Continuing Education equivalent to 12
hours every year
Nurse Delegation
Mental Health and Dementia
Food Handling
Diabetes
CPR / First Aid

Adult Family Home staff and providers have to undergo the following training: 

  1. Fundamentals of Caregiving 

  2. Home Care Aide Certification / CNA 

  3. Continuing Education equivalent to 12 

  4. hours every year 

  5. Nurse Delegation 

  6. Mental Health and Dementia 

  7. Food Handling 

  8. Diabetes 

  9. CPR / First Aid

HOW DO I KNOW WHICH TYPE OF CARE FACILITY TO PLACE MY FAMILY MEMBER IN?

Genera

Generally there are three basic types:

1. Assisted Living Facilities are for people who are independent in most ways and who are fully cognizant but might need some assistance with daily living activities. Assisted living is a desired place for seniors who do not yet need an adult family home. They are ambulatory, can easily walk to elevators, the lunchroom, and activities that are provided and do not need watching while sleeping during the night. They live as independently as possible in an apartment setting. Assisting living facilities are typically not licensed to give nursing care.

2. Adult Family Homes are for those who are forgetful, may fall, need help with remembering things, need assistance with activities of daily living, need monitoring or supervision during the day and at night, or who need more intensive help and care. When seniors require 24-hour specialized care and they are at risk for injuring themselves they should consider moving to an Adult Family Home which has both day and night professional licensed care.

3. Nursing Homes are for those that require more advanced or specialized care in which a typical Adult Family Home cannot provide. A person who has been determined by a physician to have a condition that requires skilled nursing facilities (i.e., they are a danger to themselves or others or have a debilitating condition) would be a candidate for a nursing home.

lly there are three basic type

1. Assisted Living Facilities are for people who are independent in most ways and who are fully cognizant but might need some assistance with daily living activities. Assisted living is a desired place for seniors who do not yet need an adult family home. They are ambulatory, can easily walk to elevators, the lunchroom, and activities that are provided and do not need watching while sleeping during the night. They live as independently as possible in an apartment setting. Assisting living facilities are typically not licensed to give nursing care.

2. Adult Family Homes are for those who are forgetful, may fall, need help with remembering things, need assistance with activities of daily living, need monitoring or supervision during the day and at night, or who need more intensive help and care. When seniors require 24-hour specialized care and they are at risk for injuring themselves they should consider moving to an Adult Family Home which has both day and night professional licensed care. 

3. Nursing Homes are for those that require more advanced or specialized care in which a typical Adult Family Home cannot provide. A person who has been determined by a physician to have a condition that requires skilled nursing facilities (i.e., they are a danger to themselves or others or have a debilitating condition) would be a candidate for a nursing

WE ARE CONCERNED ABOUT PLACING OUR FAMILY

WE ARE CONCERNED ABOUT PLACING OUR FAMILY MEMBER IN A CARE FACILITY AND WE ARE FEELING CONFUSED AND GUILTY ABOUT DOING SO.

This is a very common and reasonable response that is shown by a large number of people, if not the majority of them, when they are presented with a decision that is so difficult. Be reassured that demonstrating care for the well-being of a loved one by striving to secure their protection is an act of love. This may be done by working to ensure that they have enough protection. At some point, the family or guardian will have to come clean and confess that dangerous falls and other issues exist, and then work to find solutions to those difficulties. It is possible for providing care for an elderly parent or loved one to be a demanding and time-consuming task for families, as well as a disturbance to other elements of their life, such as job, other family members, hobbies, and children. This is especially true if the individual they are caring for also has distinct needs and services that need to be met. In many cases, the responsibility is assigned to a single member of the family, who then suffers from burnout as a direct consequence of taking on the additional responsibility. It is often the best course of action to place a member of the family who is unable to care for themselves in an environment that is structured similarly to a home and is staffed by individuals who have received enough training in the provision of care at all hours of the day and night.

THE PROCESS TO MOVE IN ?

Step 1- Consultation

We treat all initial calls as professional consultations. In this consultation we will discuss the issues that most concern you or your loved one. If you decide to continue with us following consultation, we will arrange for a meeting and tour of the facility with the potential resident and their family. If we all come to an agreement that this facility and the resident are right for one another than we will arrange for an assessment to be made by a qualified registered nurse. Assessments need to be made before time of move in.

Step 2- Assessment

A qualified registered nurse or case manager will conduct an assessment of you or your loved one’s physical and emotional health, as well as their current living situation. Information will be obtained by talking to you or your family regarding your personal and medical history. This assessment will provide you and your family with solutions to your caregiving needs by formulating a plan of care that fulfills the loved one’s unique needs.

Step 3 – Move in

Once the assessment is completed and reviewed by the facility, move in can start taking place. At time of move in or prior, the facility and you or your loved one will meet to sign contracts and consents. An inventory of the resident’s belongings will take place. Thirty days after move in the facility will make a detailed care plan tailored for the specific need of the resident. Afterward, care plans will be renewed every twelve months or if a significant change occurs in the resident’s medical situation.

WHY CHOOSE AN ADULT FAMILY HOME ?

Because, Is your loved one in need of help and a Nursing Home and/or an Assisted Living place seems like the only choice? An Adult Family Home can be a better alternative to a Nursing Home or Assisted Living. Adult Family Homes are private homes licensed by the state of Washington to care for up to six individuals. Care is provided in a home-like environment rather than an institutionalized setting which greatly improves the quality of life for each individual. Adult Family Homes offer varying levels of assistance with personal care, activities of daily living, intermittent nursing care, assistance with or administering of medications. Some Adult Family Homes also provide specialized care to people living with developmental disabilities, dementia, or mental health issues.

–So please make an Adult Family Home definitely a choice to consider!

Assisted Living

WHAT IS ASSISTED LIVING?

An assisted living residence is a long-term senior care option that provides personal care support services such as meals, medication management, bathing, dressing and transportation but an Adult Family Home can be a better alternative to a Nursing Home or Assisted Living. Adult Family Homes are private homes licensed by the state of Washington to care for up to six individuals.

FAST FACTS ABOUT ASSISTED LIVING

  • Number of U.S. assisted living communities: 31,100
  • Number of apartments: 475,500
  • Number of residents: 735,000
  • Average length of stay: 36 months
  •  Percentage of residents that receive help with three or more ADLs: 40%

Source: National Center for Assisted Living

A relatively new concept 25 years ago, today assisted living is the fastest growing long-term care option for seniors. Assisted living facilities, with their wide range of services, provide a senior housing solution for adults who can live independently, but also require some assistance. For many seniors, assisted living provides just the level of care they need to flourish and triumph in their new phase of life. After all, the golden years should be enjoyable-and assisted living has more options than ever before.

ASSISTED LIVING COSTS

Assisted living costs vary, depending on the following factors:

  • Type of residence
  •  Size of apartment (studio, one or two-bedroom apartment)
  • Types of services needed
  • Geographical location of the community

Many communities charge a basic rate that covers all services, with an additional fee for special services. Most assisted living communities charge a month-to-month rate, but there are also long-term options available.

Typically, base rates only cover room and board and a service of daily meals, determined by the assisted living community. Sometimes there are entrance fees, deposits and laundry and housekeeping fees. But because these all vary by community, it’s important to ask each community about their individual costs and services.

According to Genworth.com, the average cost for a one-bedroom assisted living apartment in the U.S. in 2014 was $3,500 per month; an increase of 1.19% over 2013 with a five-year annual growth of 5.71%. Studio and two-bedroom assisted living apartments varied, accordingly.